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Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
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Filter by Categories
Atlantic Seaboard
Blues
Bo Kaap
Bree Street
Cape Town Central
City Centre
Claremont & Newlands
Constantia & Tokai
Durban
Gardens
Green Point to De Waterkant
Harrington Street
Hermanus
Hout Bay
Informative
Kalk Bay
Kenilworth & Wynberg
Khayelitsha
Kloof Street
Long Street
Loop Street
Milnerton to Blouberg
Mowbray & Rosebank
Muizenberg
Northern Suburbs
Observatory
Overberg
Parliament
Rondebosch
Salt River
Scarborough to Noordehoek
Sea Point to Mouille Point
Southern Peninsula
Southern Suburbs
Tamboerskloof
Uncategorized
Vredehoek & Oranjezicht
West Coast
Woodstock

Endless Daze: Rock n Roll with an African Message

Endless Daze, a live music festival held just outside Cape Town, was a haze filled with nostalgia and novelties that should not be easily forgotten. The smashing of guitars, stage diving and general energy pumping from the stage had people moving like they’d had tequilla for the first time. It’s official. Rock ‘n Roll is back, and it’s returned with an African vengeance. The best news is that it’s got a message of social change and ensuring environmental sustainability is kept a thing.

The weekend was a rollercoaster of flamboyance and fun. PJ, drummer for the Runaway Nuns put it into perspective, saying “I had the feel good feeling, the James Brown feeling.” Some of the real crowd movers include WITCH (We-Intend-To-Cause-Havoc),a Zambian psychedelic rock band from the 1970’s that hasn’t played in Africa in over 30 years. The lead singer Jagari (the African Jagger), rocked the house with moves and energy that The Rolling Stones would have been in awe of. Sihle, the Runaway Nuns bass guitarist who rocked the stage like a soulful soldier on Saturday night said “WITCH flipping blew my mind. It was flipping rad. Flipping groovy.”

 

Morena Leraba, a shepherd from Lesotho told the stories of people from generations before and let the band send the dancing shivers into the bones of everybody there. Even though the festival wasn’t as racially integrated as it should be, there was a real feeling in the air of Africanism. Msaki spoke optimistically about Endless Daze saying, “Racial integration is intentional, and I think a space like this is making intentional steps towards creating patrons of bands that have largely black followings.” It’s true and it’s amazing to see how African bands are creating a movement of inspiration and integration.

 

Candice Gordon, an act from Ireland that really rocked Endless Daze explained how music is interpreted by people. She said, “When people interpret artists, they create the art again by processing their own world view of the music.” Msaki, an East London sensation explains the message of music saying, “When I’m there for that hour, you have opened yourself up and you’re made of water. I can change your molecules, for goodness sake.” The music for sure sent a strong message at Endless Daze. People relaxed, people expressed themselves and people comprehended the world around them.

There was a lot of discussion behind the feeling of social change. The idea of integration was in the air. People are keen to make things happen. The feeling was of people wanting to do things, which is what the world so desperately needs. Now we need to create a culture of action behind it. Siyabonga, singer for The Brother Moves On spoke out strongly on this: “When bringing about social change, we must stop focusing on the distraction of change. Real change is in the action. Real change is actively doing something now to change something bigger in the future.”

 

The Brother Moves On, a band which delivers a performance that will send you on a spiritual journey. Their songs may be a mix of various languages, but their message translates with pure understanding, no matter where you’re from. Their songs sing of the struggles in South Africa and their message is for the unheard, the muted. They’re full of energy and may put you in a closed eye trance, one that shuts off your mind and makes you think clearly about all the possibilities in life, only coming out of the trance to open your eyes and catch glimpses of the sermon on stage.

The festival encompassed all angles with hundreds of people waking up at the crack of dawn to participate in the beach clean-up. Speaking about the people that participated, Aaniyah Omardien head of the Beach Co-Op commented “I think the festival itself draws people that love being in nature. A lot of them surf and a lot of them just enjoy being at the beach. I think people are very stoked and very happy that the festival wants to be more eco-conscious.” Festival goers managed to pick up 1142 cooldrinks lids, 190 chip packets and 412 ear buds, amongst many other pieces of litter.

Overall, Endless Daze was one for the books. One that put my faith back in Rock and Roll and in Africa in general. I’m not sure if it was the craziness of being backstage and playing the bass that A Place to Bury Strangers would smash on stage two hours later. Or if it was the madness of watching a shepherd send the soul back into the hearts of thousands of diverse people in Africa. Endless Daze was something to be remembered and something that needs to grow because it’s sending a message we all desperately need to hear.

Writer: Sebastian Daniels

If you’re looking for the best coffee shops in Cape Town, we’ve reviewed about 75 coffee shops for you. Have a look at all our reviewed coffee shops here.

If you’re looking to find more of the same photos, have a look at Gun Street Mag’s Facebook Page.

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